Article

31.05.2021

Optimise your working capital with factoring

How can you keep your working capital healthy while incorporating the requisite financial flexibility? Factoring helps you to finance your cash requirements in a proper, timely and suitable way.

Securing liquidity is the key to financing your working capital requirements and keeping your business running smoothly at all times. That's exactly what factoring offers.It is a structural solution for optimising working capital. In the video below (in Dutch) in less than half an hour you will gain a clear picture of what factoring has to offer.

If you prefer to watch the video in French, click here.


Factoring: a tailored structural solution

In exchange for transferring your invoices to an external factoring company, you can count on fast, flexible financing, monitor the collection of your invoices, and protect yourself against potential bankruptcy among your customers. Each factoring solution is tailored to fit the needs of your business. This includes companies operating at international level. In Belgium, one in six companies currently outsource their invoices to an external factoring company. The same trend is evident in other European countries.

Do you have any questions, or would you like to discuss how factoring can help you? Contact your relationship manager or send us your details via the contact form and we will get in touch with you.
Article

03.04.2018

Five steps to recovering your unpaid amounts

Late payments and unpaid invoices weigh heavily on a company's financial health. To manage your finances, it is essential that you put in place an effective recovery strategy, while maintaining a commercial relationship with your customers.

Take care of your invoicing upstream

The first building block of a successful recovery strategy is implementing effective invoicing. This means before starting to recover your unpaid amounts, your company must implement everything you need in order to be paid on time. Clear invoices that are complete and free of errors are a good start to persuading your customers to settle up before the payment deadline. Also think about creating general terms and conditions that 'protect' your interests, by including (reasonable) deadlines for contesting and sanctions applied in case of default of payment. Finally, your whole invoicing process needs to work together like a well-oiled machine in terms of quality, timing, terms and more.

Adapt your approach

Next, you need to have a clear view of your outstanding receivables (customers, amounts, delays, etc.). An audit will allow you to properly assess the situation. When it comes to recovery, every case is different and varies depending on your sector, your size and your position (strong or otherwise) on the market. Moreover, one customer is not the same as another and you must often adapt your strategy. Your best customer, who always pays on time, cannot be treated in the same way as a chronic late-payer or a new purchaser (and did you think about checking their solvency before starting to do business with them?). Conclusion: separate your clientele using relevant criteria to be able to act in the best way.

Act preventively

Your recovery strategy must include a pre-emptive phase to intervene before the amount is due. How? By sending a simple e-mail, for instance, a few days before the payment deadline. This doesn't cost you anything and it gives a clear signal that you are waiting for payment. You could even add a commercial dimension here by asking your customer if they are satisfied with the product, the sale or the service. This type of diligence will be appreciated by your debtors. Along the same lines, and although it may be more costly in terms of resources, you could add a phone call from your sales team. In this instance (and all the others, in fact), you need to oversee the coordination of your sales and administrative department.

Articulate your recovery strategy

If your customers still don't pay, in spite of these preventive actions, you need to react quickly and send your debtors a reminder. Always follow through with what you have told them so as not to lose credibility. Get there slowly but surely – and attach real significance to the form and timing of your reminder letters. In your first letter use a courteous tone, because everyone forgets at some point. What if your debtor doesn't always react? Follow up with a second and (at most) third payment demand: a registered letter, possibly sent by a lawyer for the final reminder. Be increasingly firm and send a formal notice. Try to call your customer in between each attempt (especially those who are worth the effort). This is a great way of reaching a compromise, such as by suggesting a payment schedule if your debtor has specific problems with financial management. An amicable agreement is often better than a futile (and time-consuming) battle. And what's more, this may help you to continue your commercial relationship!

Follow through... if it's worth it

Are your reminders falling on deaf ears? Have you failed to receive a valid explanation? Have you even tried to negotiate in vain? It may (unfortunately) be time to revert to a higher power and take legal action. You won't be surprised to hear that this is the most complex, costly and time-consuming way to recover your unpaid amounts. This is why not all invoices are worth this amount of effort. Properly assess the situation (the amount of the invoice, the 'position' of the customer in your portfolio, etc.). If you're thinking about taking the matter to court, you should seek the advice of a lawyer. But remember there is no guarantee that things will be simple (from simple non-payment, to dispute of the invoice or even bankruptcy of the customer).

Final words of advice

Whatever the result of your recovery efforts, make sure to keep a record of any 'accidents' in terms of your customers' late and missed payments. This kind of monitoring may prove very useful in future. And last but not least, you could even choose to manage customer risk (completely or partially, upstream or downstream) using external actors (such as a lawyer or bailiff) or companies specialised in recovery (such as BNP Paribas Fortis Factor). This is a more expensive strategy, but guarantees you greater peace of mind, as long as you choose the right provider...

Article

26.10.2022

Sustainable Future Forum: Belgium as a hub for green hydrogen and the role of the EU

Belgium has strong assets as an industrial and logistics hub for green hydrogen in Western Europe. Entrepreneurs, bankers and the European Union discuss the challenges and opportunities.

At the global BNP Paribas Sustainable Future Forum on 18 October 2022, held at the auditorium of BNP Paribas Fortis' new Brussels headquarters, 5 experts discussed the European Union's contribution to the full roll-out of green hydrogen. Belgium’s strategic role as an industrial hydrogen hub for Western Europe also emerged in the debate.

Hydrogen, a link in the decarbonisation of the economy

Green hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water with renewable energy. The EU considers green hydrogen as a key lever to providing clean, affordable and safe energy in the transition to a lower CO2-emitting economy. Harnessing the potential of sustainable H2 is both promising and complex. Nevertheless, with the situation in Ukraine, high inflation and the energy crisis, we have a momentum we can use to accelerate that transition.

The role of the EU: co-regulating and co-financing

Europe supports the roll-out of green hydrogen mainly in two areas. First of all, the European Union is working on clear market and industry regulation. For example, sustainability quotas for transport and industry can boost the market. In addition, legal certainty is very important to attracting private investors to urgently build out many high-tech infrastructures.

The EU taking the lead with concrete actions and project financing. This does not detract from the fact that around 40% of private investment is required. These funds should be relatively easy to access, as they are actually small amounts compared to the current investments in conventional fuels. Companies such as Engie and DEME are already financing large projects and are prepared to do even more if a long-term perspective is available. Sufficient incentive is required so that demand also increases on the user side, too. Achieving all goals requires cooperation between all stakeholders, both inside and outside the Union.

Belgium's assets as a hub for sustainable molecules

In Europe, we remain dependent on countries that can produce sustainable hydrogen cheaply. It is therefore of strategic importance to diversify the supply of hydrogen and other sustainable molecules. Belgium has many assets for import and export, storage and processing of green hydrogen as a hub for Western Europe.

Belgium is centrally located in a stable region and has large ports serving the hinterland. In addition, our country already has a strong CO2 and H2 network and benefits from offshore capacity with its location in the North Sea.

Hydrogen infrastructure financing

For the financing of hydrogen, we can draw a strong parallel with the early years of offshore wind power. At that time, we also had a lot of questions, but today the framework for wind power is clear. Hydrogen will go through the same evolution. As soon as there is a level playing field, investments will follow. To this end, BNP Paribas Fortis can offer well-known financial products.

Speakers

The five speakers represent the European Commission, science, an H2 producer from the maritime sector, the energy industry and finance.

Carla Benauges
Hydrogen and Innovation Policy Officer at the EU Commission (DG CLIMA: Directorate-General for Climate Action)

Christa Sys
Professor at University of Antwerp & holder BNP Paribas Fortis Chair Transport, Logistics and Ports

Herbert Jost
General Manager Hydrogen at DEME (dredging, land reclamation, offshore energy)

Eric Gosseye
Solutions and Partnerships Manager at ENGIE

Hendrik Deboutte
Energy, Resources and Infrastructure at BNP Paribas Fortis

Article

20.10.2022

CO2 Value fully commits to a carbon-free economy

From sustainable footpaths to fashionable dress to sophisticated e-fuel. At their annual meeting, CO2 Value, a partner organisation of BNP Paribas Fortis, illustrated very concretely how carbon capture and utilisation can help defossilise the economy.

It’s simple, in fact. Forests and oceans can absorb CO2 that is released. But fossil fuel combustion, industry and land use create so much CO2 that nature can no longer handle that absorption. The result is global warming. So we need to reduce CO2 emissions and use more renewable energy. That solution is unfortunately less straightforward in practice, although there are already many promising technologies to accelerate decarbonisation. And that is exactly what CO2 Value Europe is working towards.

Circular carbon economy

CO2 Value Europe, a partner organisation of BNP Paribas Fortis, is an inter-professional organisation representing the Carbon Capture & Utilisation (CCU) community in Europe. It strives for a circular carbon economy. It seeks alternative ways and technologies to capture CO2 and then recycle it into usable sustainable raw materials for fuels, chemicals and building materials, among others.

Crash course in CCU

The audience at this year's sixth edition of CO2 Value's annual meeting was just a little more diverse than usual. Besides members, interested companies and clients of BNP Paribas Fortis were also able to attend the meeting. And they did so in large numbers. Carbon capture and utilisation is a hot topic. A lot of companies are facing a sustainable transition and want to decarbonise. Attendees were given a crash course in 'What is CCU?', but it was mainly the concrete applications that really appealed.

Sustainable footpath

VITO, a Flemish independent research organisation in the field of cleantech and sustainable development, gave an example of how CO2 mineralisation can make the construction sector more sustainable. This technology not only leads to lower CO2 emissions, but permanently stores carbon dioxide in valuable products such as bricks and many other building materials. In Ghent, for example, there is already a footpath made of sustainable bricks.

Dress to impress

CCU can also make a difference in the fashion sector, LanzaTech proves. They convert carbon waste into sustainable fuels, fabrics, packaging and other products that people use in their daily lives. One of these is a synthetic fibre to make clothes that are sustainable without sacrificing anything in terms of comfort or style.

E-methane

Fossil fuels remain a major source of CO2. With the Colombus project, Engie, Carmeuse and John Cockerill are joining forces. They are developing an alternative fuel that will help decarbonise industry and the transport sector. CO2 released during lime production is captured by Carmeuse and then combined with green hydrogen from Engie. Based on this, John Cockerill produces carbon-neutral synthetic methane or e-methane via electrolysis as an alternative to fossil fuels. This is a great example of a circular carbon economy.

Sustainable partnership

As a partner from the very beginning, BNP Paribas Fortis is 100% behind CO2 Value's mission. Sustainability is in the bank's DNA, so we certainly encourage a new circular and industrial value chain. As a banker, we take our responsibility seriously and are happy to help develop innovative solutions that make our economy more resilient and sustainable.

Want to know more? Visit the CO2 Value Europe website.

Article

13.10.2022

Sylphar, Lansweeper and Qover win Private Equity Awards in 2022

On 12 October, our bank and the Belgian Venture Capital & Private Equity Association put the winning companies in the spotlight. With the support of Private Equity, all three completed a remarkable growth track.

The winners of the 2022 Private Equity Awards have been announced. It was the fifth time that BNP Paribas Fortis organised this event together with the Belgian Venture Capital & Private Equity Association (BVA). In addition to rewarding Belgian growth companies, this is also a good opportunity to highlight the added value of venture capital for start-up, fast-growing and mature companies.

And the winners are...

The three winners were selected from nine nominees in three categories: Venture capital, Growth, and Buy-out company of the year.

Qover was voted 'Venture Company of the Year'. This award was created for young companies that develop and market an innovative product or service with the support of a venture capital investor.

Qover enables any digital company to embed insurance in its value proposition. The company has built a tech platform that can launch any insurance product in any market, language and currency in a matter of days. The company is ready to scale up internationally and was praised for its innovative and disruptive business model.

Lansweeper was named 'Growth Company of the Year'. This category is for companies that have significantly expanded their activities through organic growth or acquisitions. They bring a financial partner on board who does not want control.

Lansweeper is an IT Asset Management platform provider that helps companies better understand, protect, and centrally manage their IT devices and network. The company has developed a software platform that can be used to create an inventory of all types of technology assets, installed software, and users. Besides setting an excellent financial track record, the company succeeded in gaining a solid foothold internationally.

Sylphar was the winner in the 'Buy-out Company of the Year' category. These are companies that achieve growth through involved management with the backing of a private equity investor with a controlling interest.

Sylphar develops and packages innovative and consumer-friendly OTC products worldwide. OTC products are medicines that are sold directly to the consumer without requirinng a doctor's prescription. Examples include tooth whitening products and skin, hair and body care products. Their spectacular digital transformation of the sales process, strong international expansion, and rapid product development were decisive factors.

"As a financial instrument, private equity is perfectly suited for boosting innovation and sustainable growth. The three winners have all proven this", says Raf Moons, Head of BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity.

Find out more about Private Equity at BNP Paribas Fortis.

Source: press release

Discover More

Contact
Close

Contact

We would like you to answer a few questions. This will help us answer your request faster and in a more appropriate manner. Thank you in advance.

You are self-employed, exercise a liberal profession, are starting up or managing a smaller local company. Then visit our website for professionals.

You are an individual? Then visit our website for individuals .

Is your company/organisation client at BNP Paribas Fortis?

My organisation is being served by a Relationship Manager :

Your message

Type the code shown in the image:

captcha
Check
The Bank processes your personal data in accordance with the terms of the Privacy Notice of BNP Paribas Fortis SA/NV.

Thank you

Your message has been sent.

We will respond as soon as possible.

Back to the current page›
Top